Summit Auto Body | Peotters Tire and Auto

For the majority of drivers, going to an auto body shop in Summit is a mysterious experience, a scary encounter with the unknown.

Once you hand over your key, you instantly feel uneasy; will your car be returned as good as new, or will the repair specialists do a shoddy job?

How will you know? How will you be able to figure out if you hard-earned money is just being tossed down the drain?

Auto Electric Repair

The best way to know if you are receiving excellent service and professional care is to find a reputable Summit Auto Body shop and then build a relationship with that shop.

However, most people who take their vehicles in to the Auto Body Shop are doing so for the first time. So, how do you know whether or not you can trust an auto body shop?

First of all, it is important to know that most auto body shops are reputable businesses. The majority of Summit Auto Body owners are just struggling to make a living like most small business owners – they want to do a great job on your car so you will return or refer others to their shop.

Collision Auto Center

However, there are a few bad apples that spoil the whole bunch, and you need to be diligent when selecting a shop.

The first thing to do is get a referral or locate a shop online using reviews and testimonials.

One of the most puzzling things about shopping for relatively expensive services (more than $500) like home remodeling, cosmetic surgery, and auto body repair is the wide range of price quotes you receive for essentially the same service. When I ran an auto body shop, we would see quotes from big name shops of $2000 for a front bumper and grille replacement. Sometimes, we could do the job for $1000 and still make a fair profit.

So, was the big name shop's work better? Frankly, yes. Their painter could get a closer color match. Their body man could line up the bumper absolutely perfect...to within a millimeter of factory spec. But...was their work twice as good? Only a body man or painter could spot the difference. From a certain angle, in a certain light, he could see the slightest mismatch in paint color. And with a fine-grade ruler. He could check the gap between bumper and fender and find the slightest differences.

But could a customer perceive the difference between a $2000 and $1000 bumper job? No chance. If I could quantify the difference, it might be (an undetectable) 5%.

I'm not advocating that you choose the lowest bid every time (there are some bad shops out there), but as a former shop owner, I can tell you with confidence that it's seldom worthwhile to choose the highest bid.

You're going to want to choose the most affordable bid from a shop with a good reputation.

Here's how to find that "just right" shop:

1. Get at least 4 bids.
2. Toss the high bid.
3. Do some research on the remaining 3 bids.
4. Check online reviews: Google, Yahoo, Yelp, etc.
5. Check with the Better Business Bureau.
6. Inspect the shop...is it clean and orderly?
7. What about the customer service? Do they answer the phone? Are they polite? Do they answer your questions? Does the manager/estimator create a good, knowledgeable impression?
8. Do they guarantee their work? You will want at least a 3 year guarantee from defects like peeling and discoloration.
9. Usually, the shop will have completed cars waiting for pick up. Inspect the work. Would you pay for that work?

After you've done your investigating, circle the shops you felt comfortable with trusting your car. Trust your gut instinct! Then choose the one with the lowest bid. You'll get a repair that you will be very happy with yet spend hundreds if not thousands less.

Create a list and call each shop to see how well you are treated on the phone.

Select three or four shops that sound good and are in close proximity to your location, and you are ready to take your vehicle in for an estimate.

You should get at least three estimates from three different shops.

The estimate may vary because Auto Body Shops may use different estimating software, but they should all be in the same ballpark. If an estimate differs by a great deal, you should ask why.

The body shop expert should be able to explain all prices on the estimate, including all price quotes and labor charges.

When you get the estimate, you should also be evaluating the Auto Body customer service:

How quickly were you acknowledged?

How efficiently were you helped?

Were all members of the staff polite and friendly?

Did the staff seem knowledgeable?

Be observant during the estimate and you will have a good idea of how you will be treated during the entire repair process.

If the customer service seems lacking, move on to the next place even if the estimate seems reasonable.

If you decide to leave your car, and the shop contacts you later to tell you about additional charges, this may be a sign that it is not a reputable and honest repair facility.

Auto Bodies

Though additional charges can happen occasionally, it is not a common practice for a reputable shop.

If you do your homework, have some patience, and get a few estimate, the odds are good that you will find a reputable auto body shop.

Once you have found one, it helps to direct all your business to them, and refer them to others.

If you do this, you will have established a good relationship, and you will no longer need to worry about finding an honest auto body shop.

The Results Are In – Who Do You Think is the Best Summit Auto Body in the Area?

Body Shop Near Home

- Hey this is Donnie Smith.

This lesson, we're gonnatalk about dent repair.

Now before we just jumpon this car and start repairing this dent, it'simportant for any repair job to wash it good withsoap and water to remove all the contaminants,the waxes and greases.

We've already done that,we used a power washer to clean the car and now we're using a wax and grease remover.

And this is just toassure that all the waxes and greases, silicones,things like Armor Alls that may have been sprayedaround the vehicle are removed, 'cause this will eliminatemany of the paint problems that arise during a repair process.

This will also save onsandpaper cause it won't be loading the sandpaperwith these contaminants.

Now we have the repair areaclean and we can begin repairs.

But before we do, we wanna take a look at the damage and seewhat's wrong with it, see where the indirectdamage is and direct damage, and determine what repairmethods we're gonna use to repair this damage.

Now when thinking aboutdamage, it's a good idea to think about water.

Because you know if somethinghits water it goes down, and when it goes down italso pushes a wave up.

So you've got the low areaand you've got the high area.

Think of damage the sameway, because any time there's a dent there's gonna be a low and there's gonna be a high.

So whenever you look at thisdamage, you can see that the center part of the dent isof course the direct damage, but then if you look up here on the top, you can see the crown, oreyebrow some people call it.

And you can see that that is pushed up.

That whole top of the fenderis actually pushed up.

So if you tried justto pull out on the low, or push down on the highthat's not gonna work.

You've got to roll themetal, you've gotta push down on that high while you'repushing out on the low.

Now, when you go todetermining what repair method you're gonna use, you mayhave some different types of tools, you may havesome high dollar tools, a stud welder gun, otherdent repair systems.

Where really what you wanna think of is what is the easiest method? If it's a hammer and dolly,you have access to both sides, then use a hammer and dolly.

Just because you've got thehighest piece of equipment does not mean you haveto use it every time.

Now on this particularrepair, if you drop the liner, you are able to get to the back side.

So if you can get to the back side, this would definitely be acandidate for hammer and dolly.

Feeling back there to see ifthere's room to get a dolly, which I determined that there is.

Another thing to remember isthat whenever you're repairing a dent to reverse what happened.

You wanna work from the outside in.

First in, last out.

So whatever happened first in an accident, that's the last thing you wanna repair.

Also remember whenworking with thin metal, it's thin, and you may be able to move some of this with yourhand some of the times.

Doesn't work every time, butI'm gonna reach back there and keeping that in mind that I'm gonna push down on that high,out on the low area, use my hands to rough this out.

Now this ain't gonna be perfect, it's just to rough out the damage, to get the majority of the damage out.

I can see that there arestill some highs and lows, I can feel 'em.

I know it's hard to see on the video, and even if you're doingthis yourself it may be hard to see this sometimes, butI've got a trick that'll help you locate the lows.

If you get a block withsome 80 grit on it, you can cross sand the damaged area, and what this'll do is that the highs will immediately go to metal, of course, 'cause they're high,but the lows, you'll see it doesn't sand it at all, andthis will identify the lows.

Now you can see the twolow areas very easy.

Now using the dolly, I'mgoing to reach behind this panel with the dollyand I'm gonna push out on those low areas.

Also, while I'm pushing outI'm gonna have to remember where those high areas areso I can tap in on those.

Remember, we always wannawork in multiple directions.

Whatever tool you're using, just remember to push out on the lowsand in on the highs.

Also, when using adolly, there's different dollies, different shapes.

You want the shape of thedolly to fit the contour of the part you're working on.

If this dolly was completelyflat it wouldn't work well with this repair.

Okay, now I am working on getting my dolly located on the back of themetal where I want it to go.

It may take a little bitof time to get it exactly where you want it, but I wantit right on those low areas, so that I can raise the low areas out.

Also while I'm raising lowareas out, while I'm pushing on them with the dolly, I wannatap down on the high areas.

This will allow the lowareas to come out while the high areas are tapped in.

This is called the Hammeroff Dolly technique, because I'm not actuallyhammering on the dolly.

The dolly is pushing out on the low, the hammer's pushing in on the highs.

There is also a Hammer on Dolly, and that's where youare hitting the dolly.

Any time you hammer on dollythat stretches the metal.

You wanna save that for your final stages, until you get the metalcloser to where you want it.

Then you can do some hammer on dolly for your final straightening.

So I'm gonna do a little bitmore metal straightening, and then I'm gonna use the block sander with some 80 grit on it tocontinue blocking that out to identify my highs and lows and see how the progress is coming.

Now whenever you're blocksanding with 80 grit to identify highs andlows, it's always important to cross sand.

By sanding in just onedirection, you're not gonna find all the highs and lows.

And this goes for if you're doing this to identify highs and lows,or block sanding body filler.

Cross sanding always levels much better.

Now we're using this sander,and this basically takes the place of what we usedto use with thicker metals, which is a body file.

However a body file will actually shave the top layer of the metalwhich would help level it.

We don't wanna do thatwith thinner metals.

We wanna use methods thatdoes not remove any metal.

So any method that you canuse that does not remove metal is always gonna be a better choice with these thinner metals.

Now I'm feeling out thedamage with my hand, just seeing what all highsand lows that I feel.

A little tip for feeling damage, because you'll have to do that often, is to use the flat of your hand.

Often I see fingertipsused, but that is not gonna catch the highs and lows,you're gonna miss 'em.

So always use the flatof your hand to be able to feel the damage.

Another trick that sometechnicians use is to use a rag, they claim that they can feel it better, it kinda eliminatesthe different textures.

You put a rag over yourhand and go over the damage and see if you can feelthe highs and lows better.

Try both ways, whichever works best is the method for you to use.

Now I feel a little bit ofhigh, so here I identified a high, so I'm just gonna tap that down with the pick side of the hammer.

I'm just basicallylowering that high area.

Now I'm going to re-blockit, re-sand it with this 80 grit to make sure thatit did remove the high area.

I feel of it, and I feelthat that feels good.

It's not perfect, butwith these thin metals, if you try to get 'em just perfect, try to metal finish 'emlike they did older metals, you're gonna weaken and thin the metal.

You wanna get it within 1/4 of an inch.

Anywhere between 1/8 and 1/4 is what most body fillersuppliers recommend.

However, you don't wannaexceed 1/4 of an inch, that's maximum after sanded.

You don't wanna exceed that amount.

This dent is well underthat, it's probably within 1/8 of an inch.

I'm noticing there's stilla little bit of a crease down here so I need to work that out.

I'm gonna get a hammer and dolly in there, I'm gonna raise in on the low area and I'm gonna tap this crease area in so that we can roll this metal back to where it's supposed to be.

As I'm pushing out with the dolly, I'm tapping in on that high area.

Now I'm being real careful herenot to hit the bumper cover.

It'd've been a better idea if I went ahead and dropped the bumper cover.

I'll probably be blending into that.

Another trick you can do is put a couple layers of masking tape.

I should've did that, Ishould've put masking tape or went ahead and dropped the bumper.

Because the last thingyou wanna do is sand into an adjacent panel,especially if it's not one that you're blending and cause damage that you have to repair.

I'm still having problemswith the low area right here, so I'm working on that.

Now the problem with this area, it's a little harder to get to'cause there's a brace there.

I'm following the same techniques, I'm gonna push out on that low area and I'm tapping around the high areas.

When I hammer on dollyyou can hear that ping, it makes a different sound.

You can hammer on dolly someto help remove that damage, but again remember thatthat stretches the metal and try to reduce theamount that you do that.

Little bit of a high, I knocked that down.

Okay, I'm gonna use my block with 80 grit to sand the damaged area some more to see if I got thedamage worked out enough to apply the body filler.

And I sand it and I feelof it, and there's still too much of a low there.

So I'm going to need to goback in there one more time and use the dolly and hammer.

I'm going to use the pickbecause there's a high here.

I'm pushing out on thatlow and I'm going to hammer on dolly a little bit,and sand it one more time to see if that has it.

And that's what it takes, itjust takes doing a little bit, feeling of it, checking your progress until you have thedamage where you want it.

We got the metal straightenedwithin 1/4 of an inch, really within 1/8, but 1/4 after sanded is the maximum amount of filler that most body filler manufacturers recommend.

No more than 1/4 of an inch.

That's the maximum amount.

I know 3M, Evercoat, they all have that on their technical data sheets.

So anything more than 1/4 of an inch you really need tostraighten it more than that.

You need to get it straighter.

Again, with these thinnermetals you don't wanna try to work it and work it,because you're gonna work-harden the metal.

It'll become work-hardened, thin, brittle, it may even crack on you.

It's almost impossible toget these thinner metals to do the metal finishingtechniques like they used to do where they'd work the metaland file it down and get it just perfect, prime it.

Now there is one exceptionto that, and that's PDR.

Paintless Dent Repair.

That's a total different set of techniques than we went over in this video.

This video is straightening metal like a body shop would perform.

Again, remember dependingon the extent of damage, like a fender, that wouldreally go into consideration, do we wanna repair that or replace it? Now on 1/4 panel, thosepanels usually cost more.

And also, it's a weld onpanel, so it's gonna take a lot of labor to replace it.

So you can have a lotmore damage in 1/4 panel than you would a fender,and still repair it.

Many times in body shops and dealerships, if there's even a couple ofhours of damage on fenders, they just go ahead and replace them, which is R and R, Remove and Replace.

Anyway, I hope you learnedsomething this lesson.

Thanks for watching, we'llsee you in the next lesson.

What Is An Damage Repair Estimate? - Auto Estimating Part 1

Auto Repair

When you think of auto body shops, the first thing that pops into your mind is usually a place where you bring your car to after you an accident that needs some sort of collision or damage repair done; you might also think that an auto body shop is a place where you would bring your car to for some minor touch up work for various scratches or dents that have mysterious migrated onto your car. Thinking these things is by no stretch wrong but another thing that auto body shops perform is custom car modifications.

The realm of things that can fall into the category of custom automotive work are endless. Everything ranging from body kits to mufflers and even paint jobs can be perform by your local body shop providing they have the proper supplies and equipment for the job. As with all things, some auto body shops have a better reputation then others when it comes to do custom work. A good thing to keep in mind is the workload of the garage you are planning on visiting on any given time. If the body shop you are trying to use is full of customers, they might very well be able to do the work but the turn around time would be long. If the reputation of the shop is good enough then it is worth the wait and going through the hassle of making other plans while your car is being worked on.

After you have decided on the type of work you would like to have done to your car, you should specifically ask one of the auto body shops you have in mind if they can perform the job. If you have a fancy car that requires special tools of mechanical knowledge then it might be out of the realm of possibility for certain garages. It is also well worth it to research the auto body work shop you are planning on visiting in terms of any complaints filed against them before you bring your car in. The best way to do this is by looking on the Internet for reports filed against the shop you are interested in.

Before any custom work is done to your vehicle you should ask upfront for a clear cut estimate and to be telephoned if any extra work needs to be performed that is vital to the success of the original job request. If you have found a good garage, they would not do any extra work without your prior consent or agreement.

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