Summit Auto Body | Peotters Tire and Auto

For the majority of drivers, going to an auto body shop in Summit is a mysterious experience, a scary encounter with the unknown.

Once you hand over your key, you instantly feel uneasy; will your car be returned as good as new, or will the repair specialists do a shoddy job?

How will you know? How will you be able to figure out if you hard-earned money is just being tossed down the drain?

Auto Body Collision Repair Shop

The best way to know if you are receiving excellent service and professional care is to find a reputable Summit Auto Body shop and then build a relationship with that shop.

However, most people who take their vehicles in to the Auto Body Shop are doing so for the first time. So, how do you know whether or not you can trust an auto body shop?

First of all, it is important to know that most auto body shops are reputable businesses. The majority of Summit Auto Body owners are just struggling to make a living like most small business owners – they want to do a great job on your car so you will return or refer others to their shop.

Auto Shop Repair

However, there are a few bad apples that spoil the whole bunch, and you need to be diligent when selecting a shop.

The first thing to do is get a referral or locate a shop online using reviews and testimonials.

What makes auto body shops so difficult to heat during the cold season? To shop owners, the answer is obvious. Auto body shops are characteristically dusty, breezy, high heat-loss environments. To make the indoor air more breathable and safe for workers, fresh air must be introduced through use of exhaust fans and/or raising overhead doors to help dissipate and eliminate contaminants. The problem is, as contaminants are pulled out, so is the heated air. Seemingly a "no win" scenario right?

So what's the most effective and efficient way to heat body shops?

Answer: Infrared radiant tube heaters.

Why Infrared?

To help answer that question, let's review what "infrared" is and how it works.

Infrared (IR) is electromagnetic wave energy that travels at the speed of light until it strikes an object. Upon striking an object, the IR energy converts to heat and is either reflected or absorbed. Dark and opaque objects (i.e. asphalt, concrete, etc.) readily absorb radiant IR heat energy, whereas highly reflective objects such as chrome and polished aluminum are poor absorbers and tend to reflect that energy away.

The most familiar IR emitter (heater) is our own sun. The sun radiates its IR energy through our atmosphere to the earth's surface, uninhibited by wind. As the earth's surface absorbs that energy, our air becomes warm.

During our North American winters the sun's rays are less dense due to the angle of the sun in the sky and our air temperatures are much cooler. But by summer solstice the sun's rays are at their peak angle and absorption is at its highest, resulting in warmer air temperatures.

Why use infrared tube heaters for your body shop?

1) Ceiling suspended infrared tube heaters mimic the warmth of the sun by warming up tools, machinery, floors and people directly, thereby warming the air indirectly.

2) Unlike forced air heaters, infrared tube heaters do not blow air throughout the space. That's a big plus in body shops where dust in painting areas is a problem.

3) Quicker heat recovery. As infrared energy absorbs into floors, tools, vehicles, etc., heat is recovered much more quickly when overhead doors are opened and closed again or when exhaust fans are cycled on and off periodically. That's because surfaces in the direct path of the infrared rays become a "heat sink". In other words, stored heat in objects re-radiates to warm the surrounding air.

4) Energy efficiency - an infrared tube heating system can save as much as 50% or more in fuel savings compared to conventional forced air. This is especially true in body shops where air exchanges are very high.

5) Infrared heaters can increase production. A carefully designed infrared tube heating system can be used to decrease drying times and enhance paint job quality. Placing vehicles in the path of infrared radiation warms cold metal surfaces. Paint applied to warm metal surfaces is less likely to run or drip than when applied to cold surfaces. And because infrared heaters don't move air around, there is less opportunity for dust particles to mix with newly applied paint.

We should note that gas infrared tube heaters are NOT to be used inside paint booths or paint mixing rooms. Tube heater emitters can reach 900 to 1100 Degrees F, well above the flash point of solvent-based primers and sprays. Spraying should be contained in a designated paint room with a filter bank and exhaust system to carry away potentially explosive fumes. Once spraying is done and the booth is ventilated with fresh air, vehicles and components can then be moved out of the spray booth to an isolated drying area where the infrared heaters are located.

Are some infrared tube heaters better than others for heating body shops?

Yes indeed.

That's where you need to do a bit of homework. A thorough review of the various infrared tube heater manufacturers can turn up some surprising differences between brands and product offerings. In your search, ask about burner design (are controls isolated from the air stream? They should be.), emitter tubing (heat-treated aluminized or cheaper hot-rolled steel?), reflector efficiency (50% efficient or 100%), and warranty (10 years is better than 5 years).

Create a list and call each shop to see how well you are treated on the phone.

Select three or four shops that sound good and are in close proximity to your location, and you are ready to take your vehicle in for an estimate.

You should get at least three estimates from three different shops.

The estimate may vary because Auto Body Shops may use different estimating software, but they should all be in the same ballpark. If an estimate differs by a great deal, you should ask why.

The body shop expert should be able to explain all prices on the estimate, including all price quotes and labor charges.

When you get the estimate, you should also be evaluating the Auto Body customer service:

How quickly were you acknowledged?

How efficiently were you helped?

Were all members of the staff polite and friendly?

Did the staff seem knowledgeable?

Be observant during the estimate and you will have a good idea of how you will be treated during the entire repair process.

If the customer service seems lacking, move on to the next place even if the estimate seems reasonable.

If you decide to leave your car, and the shop contacts you later to tell you about additional charges, this may be a sign that it is not a reputable and honest repair facility.

Automotive Shop

Though additional charges can happen occasionally, it is not a common practice for a reputable shop.

If you do your homework, have some patience, and get a few estimate, the odds are good that you will find a reputable auto body shop.

Once you have found one, it helps to direct all your business to them, and refer them to others.

If you do this, you will have established a good relationship, and you will no longer need to worry about finding an honest auto body shop.

The Results Are In – Who Do You Think is the Best Summit Auto Body in the Area?

Auto Repair Body Shop

- Hey this is Donnie Smith.

This lesson, we're gonnatalk about dent repair.

Now before we just jumpon this car and start repairing this dent, it'simportant for any repair job to wash it good withsoap and water to remove all the contaminants,the waxes and greases.

We've already done that,we used a power washer to clean the car and now we're using a wax and grease remover.

And this is just toassure that all the waxes and greases, silicones,things like Armor Alls that may have been sprayedaround the vehicle are removed, 'cause this will eliminatemany of the paint problems that arise during a repair process.

This will also save onsandpaper cause it won't be loading the sandpaperwith these contaminants.

Now we have the repair areaclean and we can begin repairs.

But before we do, we wanna take a look at the damage and seewhat's wrong with it, see where the indirectdamage is and direct damage, and determine what repairmethods we're gonna use to repair this damage.

Now when thinking aboutdamage, it's a good idea to think about water.

Because you know if somethinghits water it goes down, and when it goes down italso pushes a wave up.

So you've got the low areaand you've got the high area.

Think of damage the sameway, because any time there's a dent there's gonna be a low and there's gonna be a high.

So whenever you look at thisdamage, you can see that the center part of the dent isof course the direct damage, but then if you look up here on the top, you can see the crown, oreyebrow some people call it.

And you can see that that is pushed up.

That whole top of the fenderis actually pushed up.

So if you tried justto pull out on the low, or push down on the highthat's not gonna work.

You've got to roll themetal, you've gotta push down on that high while you'repushing out on the low.

Now, when you go todetermining what repair method you're gonna use, you mayhave some different types of tools, you may havesome high dollar tools, a stud welder gun, otherdent repair systems.

Where really what you wanna think of is what is the easiest method? If it's a hammer and dolly,you have access to both sides, then use a hammer and dolly.

Just because you've got thehighest piece of equipment does not mean you haveto use it every time.

Now on this particularrepair, if you drop the liner, you are able to get to the back side.

So if you can get to the back side, this would definitely be acandidate for hammer and dolly.

Feeling back there to see ifthere's room to get a dolly, which I determined that there is.

Another thing to remember isthat whenever you're repairing a dent to reverse what happened.

You wanna work from the outside in.

First in, last out.

So whatever happened first in an accident, that's the last thing you wanna repair.

Also remember whenworking with thin metal, it's thin, and you may be able to move some of this with yourhand some of the times.

Doesn't work every time, butI'm gonna reach back there and keeping that in mind that I'm gonna push down on that high,out on the low area, use my hands to rough this out.

Now this ain't gonna be perfect, it's just to rough out the damage, to get the majority of the damage out.

I can see that there arestill some highs and lows, I can feel 'em.

I know it's hard to see on the video, and even if you're doingthis yourself it may be hard to see this sometimes, butI've got a trick that'll help you locate the lows.

If you get a block withsome 80 grit on it, you can cross sand the damaged area, and what this'll do is that the highs will immediately go to metal, of course, 'cause they're high,but the lows, you'll see it doesn't sand it at all, andthis will identify the lows.

Now you can see the twolow areas very easy.

Now using the dolly, I'mgoing to reach behind this panel with the dollyand I'm gonna push out on those low areas.

Also, while I'm pushing outI'm gonna have to remember where those high areas areso I can tap in on those.

Remember, we always wannawork in multiple directions.

Whatever tool you're using, just remember to push out on the lowsand in on the highs.

Also, when using adolly, there's different dollies, different shapes.

You want the shape of thedolly to fit the contour of the part you're working on.

If this dolly was completelyflat it wouldn't work well with this repair.

Okay, now I am working on getting my dolly located on the back of themetal where I want it to go.

It may take a little bitof time to get it exactly where you want it, but I wantit right on those low areas, so that I can raise the low areas out.

Also while I'm raising lowareas out, while I'm pushing on them with the dolly, I wannatap down on the high areas.

This will allow the lowareas to come out while the high areas are tapped in.

This is called the Hammeroff Dolly technique, because I'm not actuallyhammering on the dolly.

The dolly is pushing out on the low, the hammer's pushing in on the highs.

There is also a Hammer on Dolly, and that's where youare hitting the dolly.

Any time you hammer on dollythat stretches the metal.

You wanna save that for your final stages, until you get the metalcloser to where you want it.

Then you can do some hammer on dolly for your final straightening.

So I'm gonna do a little bitmore metal straightening, and then I'm gonna use the block sander with some 80 grit on it tocontinue blocking that out to identify my highs and lows and see how the progress is coming.

Now whenever you're blocksanding with 80 grit to identify highs andlows, it's always important to cross sand.

By sanding in just onedirection, you're not gonna find all the highs and lows.

And this goes for if you're doing this to identify highs and lows,or block sanding body filler.

Cross sanding always levels much better.

Now we're using this sander,and this basically takes the place of what we usedto use with thicker metals, which is a body file.

However a body file will actually shave the top layer of the metalwhich would help level it.

We don't wanna do thatwith thinner metals.

We wanna use methods thatdoes not remove any metal.

So any method that you canuse that does not remove metal is always gonna be a better choice with these thinner metals.

Now I'm feeling out thedamage with my hand, just seeing what all highsand lows that I feel.

A little tip for feeling damage, because you'll have to do that often, is to use the flat of your hand.

Often I see fingertipsused, but that is not gonna catch the highs and lows,you're gonna miss 'em.

So always use the flatof your hand to be able to feel the damage.

Another trick that sometechnicians use is to use a rag, they claim that they can feel it better, it kinda eliminatesthe different textures.

You put a rag over yourhand and go over the damage and see if you can feelthe highs and lows better.

Try both ways, whichever works best is the method for you to use.

Now I feel a little bit ofhigh, so here I identified a high, so I'm just gonna tap that down with the pick side of the hammer.

I'm just basicallylowering that high area.

Now I'm going to re-blockit, re-sand it with this 80 grit to make sure thatit did remove the high area.

I feel of it, and I feelthat that feels good.

It's not perfect, butwith these thin metals, if you try to get 'em just perfect, try to metal finish 'emlike they did older metals, you're gonna weaken and thin the metal.

You wanna get it within 1/4 of an inch.

Anywhere between 1/8 and 1/4 is what most body fillersuppliers recommend.

However, you don't wannaexceed 1/4 of an inch, that's maximum after sanded.

You don't wanna exceed that amount.

This dent is well underthat, it's probably within 1/8 of an inch.

I'm noticing there's stilla little bit of a crease down here so I need to work that out.

I'm gonna get a hammer and dolly in there, I'm gonna raise in on the low area and I'm gonna tap this crease area in so that we can roll this metal back to where it's supposed to be.

As I'm pushing out with the dolly, I'm tapping in on that high area.

Now I'm being real careful herenot to hit the bumper cover.

It'd've been a better idea if I went ahead and dropped the bumper cover.

I'll probably be blending into that.

Another trick you can do is put a couple layers of masking tape.

I should've did that, Ishould've put masking tape or went ahead and dropped the bumper.

Because the last thingyou wanna do is sand into an adjacent panel,especially if it's not one that you're blending and cause damage that you have to repair.

I'm still having problemswith the low area right here, so I'm working on that.

Now the problem with this area, it's a little harder to get to'cause there's a brace there.

I'm following the same techniques, I'm gonna push out on that low area and I'm tapping around the high areas.

When I hammer on dollyyou can hear that ping, it makes a different sound.

You can hammer on dolly someto help remove that damage, but again remember thatthat stretches the metal and try to reduce theamount that you do that.

Little bit of a high, I knocked that down.

Okay, I'm gonna use my block with 80 grit to sand the damaged area some more to see if I got thedamage worked out enough to apply the body filler.

And I sand it and I feelof it, and there's still too much of a low there.

So I'm going to need to goback in there one more time and use the dolly and hammer.

I'm going to use the pickbecause there's a high here.

I'm pushing out on thatlow and I'm going to hammer on dolly a little bit,and sand it one more time to see if that has it.

And that's what it takes, itjust takes doing a little bit, feeling of it, checking your progress until you have thedamage where you want it.

We got the metal straightenedwithin 1/4 of an inch, really within 1/8, but 1/4 after sanded is the maximum amount of filler that most body filler manufacturers recommend.

No more than 1/4 of an inch.

That's the maximum amount.

I know 3M, Evercoat, they all have that on their technical data sheets.

So anything more than 1/4 of an inch you really need tostraighten it more than that.

You need to get it straighter.

Again, with these thinnermetals you don't wanna try to work it and work it,because you're gonna work-harden the metal.

It'll become work-hardened, thin, brittle, it may even crack on you.

It's almost impossible toget these thinner metals to do the metal finishingtechniques like they used to do where they'd work the metaland file it down and get it just perfect, prime it.

Now there is one exceptionto that, and that's PDR.

Paintless Dent Repair.

That's a total different set of techniques than we went over in this video.

This video is straightening metal like a body shop would perform.

Again, remember dependingon the extent of damage, like a fender, that wouldreally go into consideration, do we wanna repair that or replace it? Now on 1/4 panel, thosepanels usually cost more.

And also, it's a weld onpanel, so it's gonna take a lot of labor to replace it.

So you can have a lotmore damage in 1/4 panel than you would a fender,and still repair it.

Many times in body shops and dealerships, if there's even a couple ofhours of damage on fenders, they just go ahead and replace them, which is R and R, Remove and Replace.

Anyway, I hope you learnedsomething this lesson.

Thanks for watching, we'llsee you in the next lesson.

How To Straighten Metal On Car Parts

Autobody Repair

rev up your engines, today I'm gonna showyou how to spot a scam body shop before you get towed into one and it's too late,okay it happens to everyone eventually you get in an accident, then you have tohave your car towed to a body shop, the last thing you want is to be in anaccident be knocked around and then the tow truck guy comes and you let himdecide where to tow it, you want to know a good body shop beforehand, then writeit down and put it in your glove box so you'll have it at hand or put it on yourphone, because by law at least here in the United States you get in a wreck, youhave the right to pick wehatever body shop you want to fix your car, nobody canforce you to go to one place, but you have to understand, when the tow truckguys come, they generally get big kickbacks if they got a nice big wreckand they tow it to the body shop that they're affiliated with, they will getfive hundred a thousand maybe even more money for bringing that vehicle to thatbody shop, so you want to have one ready that you trust to say, no tow it here andif you don't know one, you still have the right to have it towed to your house, allthe insurance companies will tow it to your house then later they can tow it toa body shop, don't worry about that you just want to send it to a good job andnot just somebody who's being paid to ship your car off because they getkickbacks, so how do you find out if a body shop is a scam body shop or areally good one well you got to do a little researchhere, unless you live in Houston Texas then you can just ask me, who I use, I don'ttake any kickbacks I've sent many many customers to body shops and never took adime back from their repairs, I just want my customers to get their cars fixedcorrectly, I don't do bodywork so it's no skin off of my nose,and speaking of equipment you got to make sure that the body shop you pickhas a good paint booth, paint boots are giant areas that are completely sealed,so there's no dust they control the humidity for painting, it's veryimportant for getting body work done right, you don't want to have somebodypaint in your car that doesn't have a very good paint booth, try spray-paintingsomething outside, you're gonna see gets on it, hair everything, you got to have aplace that has a good paint booth and you have to have professional guysworking there who know how to blend paint and match it to the color of yourcar, because take a look at this, you can easily tell this bumper has been repaintedit's a completely different shade than the top of the car that wasn't painted, Imean look at that, you can see here's the one that's been repainted, it'scompletely a lighter color here it was not blended correctly, the paint doesn'teven match, so your visitor bodyshop say hey show me a car where youpainted part as a car, see if it matches and if it doesn't they're not any goodat blending paint, go someplace else and speaking of painting bumpers, check thisout this bumper was painted by a guy whodidn't even know what kind of paint to put on the car, realize that theseplastic bumpers are exactly that, they are plastic it requires a special kindof paint with a special bonding agent in order for it to stick, if you use regularcar paint that you put on the hood and put it on the bumper,guess what, it flakes off like this car did, whoever painted this bumper theyhad no notion about how to paint plastic bumpers, they shouldn't be in the bodybusiness and another big thing to check is the body shop area itself, if likethese cars all sitting all over the place they got tons of them looks likethey're busy, go back in a few weeks the same cars are sitting there, that's justa scam that guys use, I used to work for a guy like that years ago, he had all these junkcars and it would sucker people to come in and he wasn't fixing any of thosecars, you see all their stickers are out of date, some of them don't have licenseplates on them, don't go to a place like that cuz odds are, they're gonna takeforever to fix your car and may not even do a good job, because realize one thingbody shop work, it comes and it goes it's not a continuous thing, cars they breakdown all the time it's pretty continuous cars you're always breaking you got tofix them, but car wrecks they occur kind of randomly, so a lot of times these guysdon't have much business at all so if they're one of those guys thataren't that honest, they'll take your car in and say, oh it'll be ready in three days,another car comes in they're gonna make more money, they drop yours and then theyjust work on the car they're making more money, I've seen guys have cars and bodyshops for months for this reason, ask around, other people who theyuse and anybody who says that guy took forever to fix my car,don't go there, you find a guy like me I don't do bodywork, I do mechanical workbut my whole thing was, if people got here by 8:00 in the morning by 5:00 inthe afternoon most of the work I did on most of the cars were finished, I wantedto do stuff that we're in and out fast my customers were happy, they told peopleabout me, I never spent a nickel advertising because all my customerstold everyone about me, and of course you want a place that's been in business alot, but here's the kicker, you gotta do a little bit of research because I had aguy he was a great body man, but as he got older, he made a son take over theshop and his son had no interest in doing bodywork on cars really, so it'stime went on, I used the guy for a decade and a half, but then when a son took overI sent customers there they could bring the car over to me and I'd look at themand you could see scratches from the sandpaper that they didn't make smoothand paint it over so it had permanent scratches in it, you got to make surethat the person who's running to place cares about what his shop puts out andhere's where the Internet can really help you out a lot, because of peoplehave crappy bodywork done and it doesn't look right, they're gonna complain on theInternet, so if you do a research on the guy and you see, there's complaintsall over the place about this guy then you'd think, I'm not gonna go thereI'm gonna go somewhere else and although I'm always trying to save people moneyhere, don't go too cheap with bodywork you see those ads when I was a kid itused to be we'll paint any car for you know 59.

95 now it's like 200 or 300dollars, you're not gonna get a very good paint job of your car for that kind ofmoney these days, I had my old Celica done like five years ago at one ofthose places and you can see the paint's flat, it just doesn't hold up, to do agood paint job costs a lot of money to paint the entire car and speaking of agood shop a good shop handles all insuranceclaims, you don't do anything, if they say we want some money up front, you gosomeplace else, the good ones they all use insurance companies where they callit up, they handle all the paperwork if there's a problem they call up theinsurance company and say, look we just pulled off the bumper and found out thatthere's more damage underneath, then they can send a guy to look to make surethat's the truth, you don't have to get involved in the actual repair, and like anything you pretty much have to feel out the shop, as peoplein Texas have always said, you don't want a guy who's all hat and no cattle, or when Iwas younger in New York, hey you don't want the guy who's got the motorcyclejacket, but he doesn't have the motorcycle, there's plenty of good body shopsout there, you just have to find them, but since people are always getting in wrecks, heythat's your friends, see cars that were wrecks that they had fixed, look at it closelyand look at it in the Sun when the sun's shining, because the human eye we can seemillions of different varieties of colors, you can see hey wow that wasfixed really well or hey that doesn't match at all or there's paintthat's bubbled up or you look at the fender the guy replaced and parts ofthe gaps or half an inch and other parts are an inch and a half gap, you knowthat place does lousy work and don't go there and when you do find a good bodyshop hey, pass the word of mouth around go on the internet tell people, tell yourfriends about it, because if you find a good body shop, you tell other peopleabout it, they're going to continue to do good work, especially when they say, heyJoe sent me, they don't want Joe to get mad because if he's telling a bunch ofpeople how good they are and he does lousy work, they know they're gonnalose business and if they don't have to spend me advertising money like I neverspent, that's more money in their pocket and less money out of yours that's payingfor the body shop and the advertising, so take a tip for me and find a good bodyshop before you get in a wreck, because it's often too late then and you'll bestuck towed to some place where everybody's getting kickbacks fromeverybody else and the work is relatively shoddy,so if you never want to miss another one of my new car repair videos, remember toring that Bell!.

Auto Body Mechanic

New Jersey Auto Body Shop | Peotters Tire and Auto