Summit NJ Tires and Auto | Peotters Tire and Auto

For the majority of drivers, going to an auto body shop in Summit NJ is a mysterious experience, a scary encounter with the unknown.

Once you hand over your key, you instantly feel uneasy; will your car be returned as good as new, or will the repair specialists do a shoddy job?

How will you know? How will you be able to figure out if you hard-earned money is just being tossed down the drain?

Auto Body Mechanic

The best way to know if you are receiving excellent service and professional care is to find a reputable Summit NJ Auto Body shop and then build a relationship with that shop.

However, most people who take their vehicles in to the Auto Body Shop are doing so for the first time. So, how do you know whether or not you can trust an auto body shop?

First of all, it is important to know that most auto body shops are reputable businesses. The majority of Summit Auto Body owners are just struggling to make a living like most small business owners – they want to do a great job on your car so you will return or refer others to their shop.

Auto Collision And Repair

However, there are a few bad apples that spoil the whole bunch, and you need to be diligent when selecting a shop.

The first thing to do is get a referral or locate a shop online using reviews and testimonials.

(upbeat music) - Hey, this is Donnie Smith.

Have you ever overground metal, making it too weak and too thin? Well it's not that hard to do with these thinner metals.

What about when working with body filler? Have you ever gotten it in cracks, gaps, other placesthat you don't want it? Takes quite a bit of time to get that out of there and clean it up.

So if you'd like to learn some tricks, how to prevent over-thinning your metal when working with thin metal, and how to keep fromgetting all the body filler in the places you don'twant it in the first place, then you're in luck, because that's what we'regonna show you in this video.

Alright, let's just goahead and get started.

What we're gonna do to eliminate grinding a lot of the metal off,is to use a DA Sander, and we can use 36 grit, or 80.

I'm using 80 here.

That usually works well.

May take just a little bit longer to remove the paint coatings, but you're not gonna chancegrinding too much metal off.

This does not take the amountof metal that grinding does.

Now with thinner metals,I would recommend this.

Now if you're working on older vehicles, grinding may be a little quicker, and that may still work fine.

Okay, now for the tip of how to eliminate getting body filler in places you don't want it, and that's simply to mask it off.

On the edge, I don't want the body filler wrapping around the edgewhere I have to clean it up, so I'm gonna mask that off.

Any gaps, for instance here, there's a, where the molding goes, I don't want body filler to wrap in there where I'm gonna have to sand it out, so I'm gonna use the bodylines that's on the car, and use that as a dividing line to make nice, sharp lines at, so that the body fillerdoes not get in these areas.

(upbeat music) Okay, now I'm mixing thebody filler up in the tube.

I'm gonna let the air out of the cap, so that it'll mix well.

And once I remove some of the air, I'll put the cap back on, and now I'm just gonnamix it inside the tube, because this hardener reallydoes separate a lot in there.

If you don't do this, you'll have liquid-ysubstance that comes out, and you don't want that, so be sure that you mixit up well in the tube before you use it.

Now I've already got somebody filler out here, and I used a paint stick toput some on this mixing board.

And I'm gonna get this hardener, I'm gonna apply a stripfrom edge of the body filler to the other, and that usually is a pretty good mixing ratio.

And notice I'm using a spreader to mix it.

I'm not using a paint stick to stir it, because that could put air bubbles in it.

If you get air bubblesin your body filler, that's gonna create pinholes, whenever you go to sanding body filler.

So it's always best towork the air bubbles out.

Just spread it out on your filler until it's nice and uniform.

You don't want there tobe any hardener streaks.

You wanna mix it until it's one color.

(upbeat music) Okay, now I have the filler mixed good.

It's nice, uniform, one color.

We don't have any hardener streaks in it, so we know that it's mixed well.

I'm gonna apply the body filler.

Now to do this, I'm gonnaapply a tight coat first, and what that is, iswhere I take a thin coat of body filler, and push really hard down on the spreader, so thatI push it into the metal.

That helps it adhere better to the metal, so that you don't have any problems with adhesion at a later point.

Now once I get the tight coat on, I come back with a fill coat, and that's where I'm gonnaput a little bit less pressure on the spreader, which allows it to fill the damaged area in.

(upbeat music) Okay I have the fill coat applied.

Now here's a tip for you to eliminate a lot of the sanding, and that is to work on your edges, because if you have real hard edges, it's gonna take more sanding.

So what I'm doing here, is I'm using the spreader, and on the edges I'm kind of feathering that body filler out, so that edge is a real thin layer, and you don't have that big, hard edge to try to sand out.

Okay, now let this setup for just a little bit, and you don't want to do it immediately after you apply the body filler.

You wanna let the filler set, but you don't want it to be dry either.

But as it's kind of in its green state, go ahead and pull the tape off.

This will leave you nice clean edges.

And also before it fully cures, you can block sand lightly, you don't wanna sand too hard, just to help level someof the highs and lows.

Okay, now I allow it to dry, and started block sanding it.

Now I'm starting out with 36 grit, because that's gonna levelthe filler really fast, but notice that I'mstaying within the filler.

My block is not slidingout onto the paint, because I don't want those deep scratches getting onto the paint surface.

I'm just wanting to level the filler.

(upbeat music) Also notice that I'm sandingin different directions.

I'm not just going at oneangle the entire time.

So I change it up.

And what sanding indifferent directions does, is it's gonna help youget a more level surface.

So always sand in different directions.

(upbeat music) (sanding) (upbeat music) Once you have it level, switch to 80 grit.

That's what I'm doing here.

First, I'm gonna apply some guide coat, and this just to helpidentify highs and lows, and you'll know whenever you get rid of the 36 grit scratches.

Makes it easier to see this way.

Now also notice I am sandingout on the paint a little bit.

I'm not going too far, but you do wanna sand out further than you did with your 36 grit.

You wanna make sure all 36 grit scratches are removed during this step.

(upbeat music) Okay I finished blocking, and I'm feeling for high areas.

And usually if you seemetal spot areas like this, that's gonna indicate that it is high.

And that happens sometimes, and if it does, what you need to do is get your pick hammer, and lightly tap down on those metal areas.

And what this is gonna do, is it's gonna lower that metal.

(upbeat music) And here's another tip for you.

If you're having problemsfilling the bodywork, and determining highs and lows with your hand, with your bare hand, use something like this, a wipe all, or a towel or somethingto put between the panel and your hand.

And this may help you be able to feel the highs andthe lows much better.

Now I'm gonna use the tape, because I'm gonna be applying some putty, so I'm gonna do the same thingI did with the body filler, the edges, and that indention where the body side molding goes.

I'm gonna tape all that off, to keep all the filler out of that.

Now when using putty, it lays out a littlethinner than body filler, so I usually just go halfway, rather than from one edgeof the filler to the other.

So I'm gonna do about halfthe amount of hardener.

(upbeat music) But everything else is basically the same.

Mix it until it's one uniform color.

Don't want any streaks in there.

And the good thing aboutputty is it's thinner, and it's easier to get a nice skim coat, but you do wanna do the tight coat, followed by a fill coat.

And another thing about a putty, is you can go over the entire repair area, from paint edge to paint edge, and that helps any imperfections you had in your sanding flaws, or sanding scratches,or anything like that, it's gonna fill in.

(upbeat music) And after allowing it tosetup for a few minutes, now I'm gonna peel the tape.

(upbeat music) Now when sanding finish putty, I'm not gonna start out with 36 grit.

I'm gonna start out withthe 80 to level it out.

And also I wanna let it fully dry.

I really don't wanna try to sand putty in its green state, so I'llallow it to dry all the way.

Then I'm gonna get 80 on a block, and I'm gonna sand it.

And I'm gonna cross sand it.

Make sure it's good and level.

(upbeat music) Once I have it leveled with 80, I'm gonna use the guide coat, and then I'm gonna comeback with 150 to 180.

I'm using 150 here I believe, but anywhere between 180and 150 will work fine for smoothing out your 80 grit scratches.

And this guide coat, it will help you identify any lows that you may have if there are any, or let you know whenever you got all the 80 grit scratches sanded out.

(upbeat music) And one last thing you wanna do, before you send it offto start priming it, you wanna make sure it fits.

Make sure everything aligns.

Make sure that your body work is right.

So you're gonna have toput it up to the car, and make sure everything works.

(upbeat music) Always, thanks for watching this video.

Be sure and share it with your friends.

Give us a thumbs up, a like, and be sure to subscribe to our channel.

Also be sure to go to CollisionBlast.

Com.

And there we have hours of free autobody and painttraining videos like this one, and a lot of other resources for you.

Thanks again for watching.

Have a safe and productive week, and we'll see you in the next video.

(upbeat music).

Create a list and call each shop to see how well you are treated on the phone.

Select three or four shops that sound good and are in close proximity to your location, and you are ready to take your vehicle in for an estimate.

You should get at least three estimates from three different shops.

The estimate may vary because Auto Body Shops may use different estimating software, but they should all be in the same ballpark. If an estimate differs by a great deal, you should ask why.

The body shop expert should be able to explain all prices on the estimate, including all price quotes and labor charges.

When you get the estimate, you should also be evaluating the Auto Body customer service:

How quickly were you acknowledged?

How efficiently were you helped?

Were all members of the staff polite and friendly?

Did the staff seem knowledgeable?

Be observant during the estimate and you will have a good idea of how you will be treated during the entire repair process.

If the customer service seems lacking, move on to the next place even if the estimate seems reasonable.

If you decide to leave your car, and the shop contacts you later to tell you about additional charges, this may be a sign that it is not a reputable and honest repair facility.

Automotive Repair Shops

Though additional charges can happen occasionally, it is not a common practice for a reputable shop.

If you do your homework, have some patience, and get a few estimate, the odds are good that you will find a reputable auto body shop.

Once you have found one, it helps to direct all your business to them, and refer them to others.

If you do this, you will have established a good relationship, and you will no longer need to worry about finding an honest auto body shop.

The Results Are In – Who Do You Think is the Best Summit NJ Auto Body in the Area?

Auto Collision Repair Shops

When you think of auto body shops, the first thing that pops into your mind is usually a place where you bring your car to after you an accident that needs some sort of collision or damage repair done; you might also think that an auto body shop is a place where you would bring your car to for some minor touch up work for various scratches or dents that have mysterious migrated onto your car. Thinking these things is by no stretch wrong but another thing that auto body shops perform is custom car modifications.

The realm of things that can fall into the category of custom automotive work are endless. Everything ranging from body kits to mufflers and even paint jobs can be perform by your local body shop providing they have the proper supplies and equipment for the job. As with all things, some auto body shops have a better reputation then others when it comes to do custom work. A good thing to keep in mind is the workload of the garage you are planning on visiting on any given time. If the body shop you are trying to use is full of customers, they might very well be able to do the work but the turn around time would be long. If the reputation of the shop is good enough then it is worth the wait and going through the hassle of making other plans while your car is being worked on.

After you have decided on the type of work you would like to have done to your car, you should specifically ask one of the auto body shops you have in mind if they can perform the job. If you have a fancy car that requires special tools of mechanical knowledge then it might be out of the realm of possibility for certain garages. It is also well worth it to research the auto body work shop you are planning on visiting in terms of any complaints filed against them before you bring your car in. The best way to do this is by looking on the Internet for reports filed against the shop you are interested in.

Before any custom work is done to your vehicle you should ask upfront for a clear cut estimate and to be telephoned if any extra work needs to be performed that is vital to the success of the original job request. If you have found a good garage, they would not do any extra work without your prior consent or agreement.

Car Body Repair - Time Lapse - cheap DIY

Automotive Shop

What makes auto body shops so difficult to heat during the cold season? To shop owners, the answer is obvious. Auto body shops are characteristically dusty, breezy, high heat-loss environments. To make the indoor air more breathable and safe for workers, fresh air must be introduced through use of exhaust fans and/or raising overhead doors to help dissipate and eliminate contaminants. The problem is, as contaminants are pulled out, so is the heated air. Seemingly a "no win" scenario right?

So what's the most effective and efficient way to heat body shops?

Answer: Infrared radiant tube heaters.

Why Infrared?

To help answer that question, let's review what "infrared" is and how it works.

Infrared (IR) is electromagnetic wave energy that travels at the speed of light until it strikes an object. Upon striking an object, the IR energy converts to heat and is either reflected or absorbed. Dark and opaque objects (i.e. asphalt, concrete, etc.) readily absorb radiant IR heat energy, whereas highly reflective objects such as chrome and polished aluminum are poor absorbers and tend to reflect that energy away.

The most familiar IR emitter (heater) is our own sun. The sun radiates its IR energy through our atmosphere to the earth's surface, uninhibited by wind. As the earth's surface absorbs that energy, our air becomes warm.

During our North American winters the sun's rays are less dense due to the angle of the sun in the sky and our air temperatures are much cooler. But by summer solstice the sun's rays are at their peak angle and absorption is at its highest, resulting in warmer air temperatures.

Why use infrared tube heaters for your body shop?

1) Ceiling suspended infrared tube heaters mimic the warmth of the sun by warming up tools, machinery, floors and people directly, thereby warming the air indirectly.

2) Unlike forced air heaters, infrared tube heaters do not blow air throughout the space. That's a big plus in body shops where dust in painting areas is a problem.

3) Quicker heat recovery. As infrared energy absorbs into floors, tools, vehicles, etc., heat is recovered much more quickly when overhead doors are opened and closed again or when exhaust fans are cycled on and off periodically. That's because surfaces in the direct path of the infrared rays become a "heat sink". In other words, stored heat in objects re-radiates to warm the surrounding air.

4) Energy efficiency - an infrared tube heating system can save as much as 50% or more in fuel savings compared to conventional forced air. This is especially true in body shops where air exchanges are very high.

5) Infrared heaters can increase production. A carefully designed infrared tube heating system can be used to decrease drying times and enhance paint job quality. Placing vehicles in the path of infrared radiation warms cold metal surfaces. Paint applied to warm metal surfaces is less likely to run or drip than when applied to cold surfaces. And because infrared heaters don't move air around, there is less opportunity for dust particles to mix with newly applied paint.

We should note that gas infrared tube heaters are NOT to be used inside paint booths or paint mixing rooms. Tube heater emitters can reach 900 to 1100 Degrees F, well above the flash point of solvent-based primers and sprays. Spraying should be contained in a designated paint room with a filter bank and exhaust system to carry away potentially explosive fumes. Once spraying is done and the booth is ventilated with fresh air, vehicles and components can then be moved out of the spray booth to an isolated drying area where the infrared heaters are located.

Are some infrared tube heaters better than others for heating body shops?

Yes indeed.

That's where you need to do a bit of homework. A thorough review of the various infrared tube heater manufacturers can turn up some surprising differences between brands and product offerings. In your search, ask about burner design (are controls isolated from the air stream? They should be.), emitter tubing (heat-treated aluminized or cheaper hot-rolled steel?), reflector efficiency (50% efficient or 100%), and warranty (10 years is better than 5 years).

Auto Body Collision Repair Shop

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